Online proposal

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With the increasing popularity of personal web pages, proposing online has become a popular way for many who are deeply involved in subsets of the Internet community to pop the question. This is usually on personal web pages or niché forums where the number of people likely to notice are limited, although there are some notable times when significant Internet celebrities have done so on popular websites.

  • On February 14, 2002, Rob Malda (under his pseudonym of CmdrTaco) asked Kathleen Fent to marry in a story posted to his Slashdot website. She replied in email under the subject "Yes", and the message simply "Dork. You made me cry. :)".[2]
  • On August 18, 2004, Colin McMillen posted a Perl script to the Obfuscation section of Perl Monks which, when executed, printed "kristen, will you marry me?". The code was arranged so that it appeared in a heart-shape with the statement "be $mine for @ever" underneath. Kristen Stubbs, the target of his affection, replied "$propose++; Yes :)".[3]
  • On January 13, 2007, Eric Burns posted a composite webcomic, composed of individual panels each illustrated by different artists, on Websnark in which he proposes to his collaborator, Wednesday White.[4]
  • On February 14, 2008, a man posted his proposal at via a Lolcat. The post was quickly updated with the recipient's response -- another Lolcat accepting the proposal.[5]
  • On August 5, 2008 a new version of Google Street View went live, in which you can see Michael Weiss-Malik (who works for Google) holding a billboard with the text "Proposal 2.0 Marry me Leslie!!".[6]
  • On June 17, 2009 the online proposal located at www.WillYouMarryMeKC.com was found and accepted by KC. The site did not contain any specific information as to the identity of the intended recipient and instead relied on a combination of serendipity, viral marketing, and an identity-verifying quiz in order to reach the correct person presumably with the initials or nickname KC. In addition to the quiz, the site allowed visitors to rate the couple's compatibility, rate the engagement ring, and share comments. The proposal is still active in that individuals are still free to answer the proposal and try the identiy-verifying quiz. [7]

See also

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